From The Stage

BioAgilytix Innovates and Grows in the ‘National Innovation Triangle’

Posted by / / BioAgilytix Insight, CRO Selection

When people hear the word innovation, they most often think of Silicon Valley or the Boston-New York corridor—but as a recent Newsweek Elite Reports article featuring BioAgilytix finds, North Carolina is rising quickly to the forefront of such conversations as the third pillar of the ‘National Innovation Triangle’. In fact, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis found North Carolina to have the nation’s fastest growing economy between Q1 2013 and Q1 2015. Much of this is due to the pharmaceutical and biotech R&D happening in and around…

The Importance of Parallelism in Biomarker Assay Development

Posted by / / BioAgilytix Insight, Biomarkers

Parallelism is a vitally important factor in clinical trial biomarker studies, but is still regularly overlooked in the industry. There are two definitions that I feel summarize parallelism best: Miller et. al describes it as “a condition in which dilution of test samples does not result in biased measurements of the analyte concentration”; whereas Lauren Stevenson and Shobha Purushothama define it as “a demonstration that the sample dilution response curve is parallel to the standard concentration response curve”. Essentially it means that when a test sample is serially diluted to…

Toxicology and Agatha Christie: An Arresting Pairing

Posted by / / BioAgilytix Insight

As much as I love my chosen field of toxicology, I don’t often turn to it as a topic for leisure reading. However, A Is for Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie is a new take on toxicological analysis. Author Kathryn Harkup is both a toxicologist and a fine storyteller. She weaves together the story of Agatha Christie’s life, the horror stories she penned, and the science behind the toxins that killed many in her stories. The book progresses by addressing a different poison used in Agatha Christie novels in…

‘It’s All Relative’: The Concept of Accuracy in Biomarker Analysis

Posted by / / BioAgilytix Insight, Biomarkers

Ligand-binding assays (LBAs) measure an analyte concentration via immunoreactivity of antibody, or binding partner, to the analyte of interest. When dealing with PK assays, reference materials are well-characterized because they are typically available in pure form and simple buffers. But in the world of biomarker LBAs, the calibrators are typically recombinant materials and therefore most often not identical to the endogenous form in the biological matrix being measured. In addition, most often it is hard to find a “clean matrix” to perform spike-recovery studies, and to confirm that the assay…