On this episode of Molecular Moments, Chad Briscoe chats with Dr. Jennifer Zemo, Director, Bioanalytical Operations at BioAgilytix. She’s a great leader, mentor and scientist with a love for helping people and the sciences. They discuss her start as a chemistry major in college, which led to her Ph.D. in Biological Chemistry and eventually to joining BioAgilytix 8 years ago. A large molecule expert, Jennifer shares how she went from pharma to CRO, the importance of customer service and the ability to be creative in assay development.

They also discuss how company culture shifted during the COVID pandemic, the first place she would like to visit after things go back to normal and what motivates her.

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Molecular Moments Episode 12: Dr. Jennifer Zemo talks mentorship, kinase proteins and customer service!: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

Molecular Moments Episode 12: Dr. Jennifer Zemo talks mentorship, kinase proteins and customer service!: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Announcer:
Welcome to the Molecular Moments podcast.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
In today's episode, we sat down with our guest, Dr. Jennifer Zemo, director of bio analysis at biogenetics. Jennifer is an expert in protein chemistry and bio analytical assays. She has excelled in what I consider one of the hardest jobs in the pharmaceutical industry. But you'll have to listen to find out what that is and why I think it's so challenging. She's a leader, a mentor and a scientist that's highly respected in the field of bio analysis. I hope you'll enjoy our conversation as much as I did. We were talking science as scientists do. So without further ado, here's another episode of Molecular Moment. Welcome to the podcast, John, I'm delighted to have you join me today. Can we start with you? Just give us a few highlights of your career.

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
Hi, Chad. Sure. Essentially, I went to a small liberal arts school for undergrad. I went to Washington College, majored in chemistry. Then when I was looking for grad schools, I stepped on the Carolina campus and fell in love. So I came to USC, got my PhD in biological chemistry. And then after that I did my postdoc at NIH looking at signal transduction pathways. After that, I went to telexes, which is now grizzles to plasma derived product company. And finally I ended up at biogenetics, where I've been for almost eight years now.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
While we're we're lucky to have you biogenetics, so clearly you were driven to science. One of the things I like to point out when I talk to other colleagues from biogenetics is when I hear that somebody was a chemist, I feel a bonding moment. And I didn't realize your undergrad as a chemist. So you're a chemist like me, turned large molecule expert. So that's that's really cool. What drove you to science? Like what really got what got you in that direction of being a scientist? That's a good

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
Question. It doesn't really run in my family and my family. They're math people and teachers and things like that. So I used to want to be a math teacher. And then I took chemistry in high school. And I'm like, you know what? I like this. I'm pretty good at it. I think you're going to go down this path. So once I got to to college, I just like the material. It came naturally to me. And so I just followed that pathway. But, you know, my parents wanted me to be a doctor, and I I didn't want that path for myself. So I chose the more, you know, still health care centric. But more into the details then than the overall big picture.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Yeah. So do you think ending up in the pharmaceutical space, was it was it an accident of where you got your first job or was it sort of consciously moving in the direction of health care and health care research?

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
I think it was mostly consciously moving in that direction. So I knew I didn't want to be in academics. There are very few role models, especially for females in academics. So I knew I wanted to get married, have kids, and so I thought industry would be the best place. And I still wanted to stay in an area where I knew I could help people. And so I think that's what drew me to the health care space.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Cool. Well, I'm excited to learn more about some of your research. Certainly, one area that is still really important in pharmaceutical development is Kinesis. And you did a lot of research in kinases in your PhD. Maybe tell us a little bit about what what our kinases and why is that important to research?

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
Yeah. So, you know, when I was looking at what type of project I wanted to look into, my was actually in biophysics. So I had to do a project in that. But I also was really interested in how the cells communicate, how signals are transduced. And with kinases, it's a fast for later things. Right. So and that's what I tell my friends. I studied a protein that first relates things and just that one change in a molecule can cause such a huge signal cascade. And that's what I wanted to look at. You know, just something that you think is so small and insignificant in real life, it can make a huge change in the body. So that's why I wanted to look at it. And I continued that from grad school through my postdoc is looking at those signalling pathways and what they can mean because there's so much that's still unknown about it.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Yeah, so I think of a lot of a lot of the kinesis in the kinase inhibitors. In oncology treatment is the primary therapeutic area with Kinesis is typically around oncology. Does it touch in other therapeutic areas as well?

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
I think it's mainly oncology, but I think there's lots of different things that maybe we don't even know about yet.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Cool, cool. And so how you end up in your postdoc at NIH.

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
So I knew I wanted to stay in this area. You know, I looked at various places and I knew that NIH has had a lot of core labs so you could learn almost any technique that you wanted to. So I went there and I learned flow cytometry, gene expression, confocal, microscopy, lots of different techniques that I hadn't been exposed to before, but I knew I wanted to signal transduction. So that's the type of path that I that I went down. And they had a one whole department just on signal transduction there.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Oh, wow. Yeah. So that yeah, that sounds exciting. And it's a great opportunity to get exposed to so many different technologies. I think it certainly has helped you be the scientist you are today. Right. Because you know, you know so much more than just kind of that narrow that narrow space. That's really cool. So you went from your postdoc and then you were, as you mentioned, Talika scuffles. Can you tell us a little more about that company? It was at the company that Afshin Molavi was at because I recall he was a guest previously. So maybe you can talk about your experience working with Afshin avoidably.

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
So he actually left about a year before I got there. He was the head of the team that I joined before. So we do have. A connection that way and some of my co-workers I telexes worked for Afshan, so I had heard all about his antics and his personality and how exciting he is about everything he does. But, you know, there I did preclinical and clinical assay development, and it was my introduction to human health and regulations. And, you know, before I don't think I wrote down lot numbers, I just did the assays and moved on. Right. But now you have to write down absolutely everything you do. So I learned that there it was eye opening, I think, to see all of all the tasks that you need to do to get a drug to the market. So, you know, I was involved with various teams and committees looking at all the things that we had to accomplish to get something on the market that was really interesting.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
So it's a big jump to go from pharmaceutical company to Acra. Right. And some people may think you're a little bit crazy. Well, you know why? Why why do that? What attracted you coming out of a coming out of the pharma to go into a.

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
So first my boss at Grizzles Attalah Chris, she had come from a S.R.O., so I had heard about the culture and the pace and the stress level at times. But ultimately when Giffels Bartali Chris, I was laid off, two thirds of my team were laid off there. So obviously I knew of Afshan. I had friends that worked at biogenetics. So I submitted my resume and I met with Afshan. And it was one month from the time that I was laid off at Grizzles two. I started at biogenetics, so very short time frame and I jumped right in.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Yeah. What year was that?

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
2013.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Yeah, 2013. Sibella the biogenetics for a good chunk of the really, you know, amazing growth with the company. Tell me a little bit about how that's been. You know, growing with a company and at the you know, the pace of biogenetics has grown.

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
It's been insane, but fun at the same time. So, you know, when I started, I think there were maybe 45 people and now there's almost 600 worldwide. I think we're still hiring and growing. And I think we've had some growing pains along the way. But with that comes a lot of opportunity for growth. So I started in the lab, you know, I was running assays every day, and then my group slowly grew month after month and now there are 60 people on my team. So I've just been along for the ride, willing to take on more work and more initiatives throughout the company. And it's been fun. I've learned a lot.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Yeah, well, there's no doubt we, you know, consider you as a go to person in the laboratory. Certainly from the from the business development side, everybody wants Jan Zemo and they're in their customer call. So so, yeah. I mean, the leadership and the success that comes out of the projects that run in your group are, you know, is amazing. And a big part of that is customer service, which means so many different things at a escrow. So in my introduction, I said that I think you have the hardest job in the pharmaceutical industry. Right. And I'm going to tell you a little bit about why I think that. So and I'm mostly referring to the BPM side of that. But then as a manager of a project managers, that is bio analytical project managers, as a manager of those bio analytical project managers, you oversee and help support them and do that job. But the combination of skills that you have to have between the project, managing the people skills to lead the scientific skills, the leading by influence skills. Right. So tell me a little more about that challenge and about what it means to, you know, the customer service, what that means to you. And in this role,

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
I think customer service is critical for BPM role. You know, you can teach science, you can teach assays, you can train people to write and analyze data, but you can't teach a personality. So you really have to have that fit of being able to communicate well, making sure that you're aware of what your clients need and not just what they want. So asking the important questions and delivering what they need. And so I think it's critical to have customer service training. So we do that here at biogenetics. And, you know, I think I've worked with some clients for almost my whole eight years here. And you develop a real relationship with them. I meet them for lunch when I go to conferences or, you know, just ask how each other's children are or pets if they get a new puppy. And I think that really means a lot to our clients to know that they have someone they can turn to when they need something.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Yeah, the mentor of mine, when I was a project manager many years ago, Marc Stiles, he made the you may even know and he's probably audited biogenetics at some point, but he was a senior project manager. This is going back almost 20 years. He said, Chad, you know, the job is to be the fingers of the customer into the lab writer, if the customer were to hire somebody and put them into the laboratory, you need to think, you know, like that's what you are. Right. So you're not just obviously sort of also beholden. I don't think that's the best word, but to the internal group. But you also have that customer focus and you need to make them look good. Right. And that's you know, if you can make them look good, probably in the end everything else comes together. So tell me, what's a day in the life look like pre covid and now and now virtual. I guess you're probably not in the lab more than a couple of days a week now. So how is that changed for you?

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
Right. So I go into the office once or twice a week just to check in on things, see how people are doing, walk around, make sure they know them here if they need me. You know, before I was in the lab every day and people would stop by my office, ask a quick question or we draw something on the whiteboard. If they didn't understand, you know, what a sample pre-treatment was or why we're getting specific signal in a certain assay format and now we have to do that on teams and it's much more difficult. You know, it takes longer. So what could have been a five to ten minute conversation is now something you have to schedule for a half an hour on someone's calendar. So I think that's been very challenging. Our BPM have worked tirelessly throughout the pandemic to make sure they're still meeting timelines. It's been tough for sure. It's been longer hours than usual, but we're still rocking and rolling and creating solutions for our clients. So it's it's just very different. And I miss that social atmosphere at work. I miss going around and saying hi and asking how someone's weekend was because it's hard to schedule 30 minutes to talk about that. Right. So I miss that aspect and I hope we get back to that soon.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Yeah. And there's and there's so many new folks that we brought in. I'm sure your group has grown in the last year and there's probably people you hardly connected with. Right? I mean, it's just a reality, isn't it?

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
It's true. I said one on one meetings with everyone on my team in the first couple of months of the year just to make sure I mean, there were some I had never met in person. I had no idea what they looked like. So I'm like, turn the camera on. I need to know what you just saw in case I see you another way. What do you look like? And, you know, it's just not our culture to be that way. So we're we're very social, teamwork oriented culture at biogenetics. And we do miss that for sure.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Yeah, certainly. I expected when I joined biogenetics that I'd be on site, you know, visiting and spending time with everyone and interacting and sitting down and all covid has changed so much. One of the things I have really enjoyed about these podcasts is the the different folks that I've gotten a chance to sit down with for half hour or 45 minutes at a time and and really have some some of these conversations. Just see what's going on, you know, and just, you know, just kind of have something, you know, some casual discussion. So when you bring in new staff and when you think about how to, you know, develop the new staff and the newest scientist, what kind of advice do you try to give the you know, the newer scientists that want to develop in the organization with some advice?

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
They're asked questions. That's a big one. Always ask questions because none of us know everything. So I encourage people to talk to anyone in the company. They don't have to ask me if I'm up the chain of command, as you will, but go to Cuba, ask questions, their QC reviewers, study coordinators. It's really about getting your name out there, learning the various areas of the company and then having a senior scientist train you or show you the ropes around the lab. So we have a buddy program. We're going to implement a mentorship program. And I just think it's critical for people to learn about others and rely on the team because it really is a team environment. And we all have such diverse backgrounds that if someone has an issue, someone else in the company has seen it before. You just got to find him.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Yeah, yeah. So tell me more about the mentorship program. I actually have not heard about this, so I'm interested.

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
Yeah. So we hired at the end of last year a global director for learning and development and he was my buddy. So we have a buddy system. Right. And so we've met a lot and he just presented his strategy and it was approved. So we'll be implementing a mentorship program for each level in the company. Analysts, scientist, BP's not necessarily your your manager, but someone else in the company who can help you grow and learn in the different assays that you want to learn or the different customer communication techniques that you'd like to learn and just kind of go through those steps and and make sure you're headed on the right path.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Yeah. You've been involved in a number of different new initiatives like that. Another one that you've been involved in is training. Training has been a big part of what you've just stepped up to do with biodiesel Excel. So tell me about your passion. For training a little bit later, what's the story there?

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
I think it comes from, you know, me wanting to be a teacher a long time ago. I like that part. I love being able to see on someone's face that they get it. You know, you draw something on the whiteboard and you're like, this is how it happens. And this is the theory behind it. And then it just clicks and then just makes me so proud that, you know, they get it and now they understand and they can teach it to someone else. So for me, you know, teaching someone else or training them, it makes them more independent. You know, it takes time, but it's time well spent. So we want to make sure people understand what they're doing, why they're doing it, and that they can teach someone else how to do it.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
What are you working on learning right now? What's kind of your passion to learn more about?

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
That's a great question. So right now, I'm setting up a summer internship program. So I'm learning about, you know, what types of projects can we have them do? How do I want to present it? Writing job descriptions? I've never had to do that before. So bringing in different aspects of the company and learning about it. But in general, what I like to learn about besides coaching and training and things like that is just the various molecules that our clients come up with and why that's important and what novel idea is going to be next. So I love investing some time and looking at people's websites and figuring out what they're going to do with the next type of molecule.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
I don't know when it'll be published, but later today I'm going to talk with a couple of individuals from Cameron came bio that are looking at a new new MRI and a delivery or RNA delivery mechanism. So talking about new and cool science, I should be there should be a really great podcast. So you'll have to have to check that one out as well. So when you are looking at new projects, is there kind of a favorite type of assay or something that you just like? This is what I really know. This is what I'm really good at. And you just dive into it. Tell me. Tell me about that. I see you smile. And so what do you think?

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
Yeah, I love a.D.A. So, you know, I do a ton of pixels, but at the end of the day, it's my favorite. There's so many different types of sample pre-treatment, you know, it's not as structured. So you can really get creative with what you do. There's lots of techniques that we we haven't tried or that are novel and that we want to try soon. So, you know, it's just being creative in assay development. And I think for me anyway, and a.D.A is where you can get most creative

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Surján you and I had the opportunity to collaborate a little bit or I kind of brought an idea. Well, you brought an idea and I kind of pushed it. And then you came back with with a great idea to to do this study on biotin interference. So which was really cool, really timely. I didn't know much about it myself until you had brought it up. So can you tell us about why, you know, why is biotin interference nothing at all and why is that a thing? Bio analytical assays?

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
Sure. So I actually saw a presentation at WRP last year and you know, it was on how biotin may or may not affect assay results. It's common. You'll see it at your doctor's office for diagnostic type tests. You know, we used that stripped Avidan biotin combination and a ton of different play based assays. And I hadn't seen anyone really do it for an ADA or PKC. So when I brought that up to our scientific team, we set up a case study. So we looked at various assays, ADA assays, Misti versus GIRoA lab. We looked at ligand binding KNAB assays. And at the end of the day, most of the time there was no interference. But we did see a false negative result in our ADA assay at the low positive control. So it's it's very possible, you know, if someone is on a high dose of of biotin or on biotin supplements for hair or nails or whatever it might be, there could be some effects and results for a clinical trial. So for an A.S.A., you may get a false negative if they are on high levels of of biotin supplements or we saw in one of our cases where it was pretty sensitive assay, the method was only to, you know, we saw some interference in a lower recovery than what we would expect. So, you know, if we're making decisions based on that, then we could assume that we need to dose at a higher level than we really need to. So, you know, my advice for most people would be, instead of looking at all of all of the different types of assays we have, perhaps include in the clinical trial, that people go off of their biotin supplements, if possible, so that we don't have to worry about that kind of interference.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Yeah, I get the impression that most of those boats and supplements and things are probably more of the vanity products that that have the really high levels, is that right?

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
Yeah, I think the middle and low levels. Are usually those just over the counter type of button supplements for for hair and nail growth, but I think there may be a very high level that can be prescribed if needed.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Ok, so yes, I was OK. I wasn't aware that. I was thinking it was kind of the other way around. See, that's where you can keep me straight. So so what you know what's next for for Gen Zemo, right. What do you think? You know what's what's down the road. What else what are your what are your dreams, you know, your scientific dreams that you might want to pursue or investigate.

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
Yeah. I don't you know, I don't know. And it's part of my job to think about this on a regular basis. Right. Career development. I like where I am right now. I enjoy the science. I do. I'm pushing myself more to do, more training, more coaching. I want to learn about coaching more people, establishing a summer internship program to help train younger scientists. But in general, I think I just like to be overall in bio analysis. I love assay development. That is my passion. I really enjoy the challenge, especially in a world where everything has to be done yesterday. Developing tough assays is hard, but, you know, I've never been one to step away from a challenge. So that's what I enjoy continuing to learn about that and growing. And in my career as far as maybe branching out to cell based assays. So I'm a plant based person, but I always like to learn, so I'm open for almost anything.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
So you're sitting in a room with the management team for operations and somebody says, we've got a super tough assay. Jen, are you saying bring it on, we'll do it in our group? Are you saying we're going to let that go to somebody else?

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
Which would you say bring it on? So, yeah, actually, a couple of years ago, maybe three, three years ago or so, we had that happen. So we got a rescue project from a pharmaceutical company. They had it at two other crows. They couldn't get it to work. There was a ton of target interference. I was given 30 days to make it work. So I'm like, you know what? Let's do it. Let's get it done. And on top of our other normal workload. So we were doubling up on assays every day, running it well, we got it to work. We got it validated, ran a ton of samples and it said every client, we still have several projects from them. So it was a great opportunity. We have had a good time and I actually got it approved for my team and I to go for a spa day. So we had a great time doing that.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Oh, nice. Yeah, yeah. That work work out some of that stress from figuring out exactly. It was a

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
Tough thirty days but we did it.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
So Jen, one of the topics that I'm really fascinated about in it, and it seems to come up in every, every one of these discussions I have is mentoring mentors, you know, that we have and the mentoring role we play. And sure enough, it came up in our conversation once again. And I wanted to dive a little bit deeper into that on a more personal level for you. Maybe you want to mention a few mentors that have had an influence on you or how those mentors have changed and directed your career.

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
Sure. So in life, I think in general, my mentors were my parents. You know, they always told me I could do whatever I wanted to do. So I think naively, as a female coming into science, I had no idea that that wasn't completely normal. And once I got to grad school and realized, you know, there's only four female professors in the chemistry department, I thought that was kind of odd. And I just, you know, my my parents have always been those who pushed me to do whatever I wanted to, no matter what. And I've just taken that with me. And I push other people to do the same. Don't think about the details or, you know, any of the politics or the drama around it. Do what you want to do and make it your own. As far as you know, I'm a mentor in science. I think my first one was Dr. Frank Creegan. He was my mentor in college. So, you know, I went to a small liberal arts school. We learned a lot about writing and reading. But on top of that, he really pushed me to figure out what I wanted. And, you know, he was our organic chemistry professor. He taught very differently than most.

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
So everything was group work. And whatever we learn in class, we would then do in the lab. And so you really had to figure out why something was happening or, you know, what does it mean when you have a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction? You know, what kind of what color crystals are you going to get in the lab? And so that was really interesting to me to see teaching done in a very hands on way. And then, you know, when I was applying to grad school, he really pushed me to go for the best. So I applied several places. I had a lot of choices to make when I decided on USC and I was thinking about taking the easy way out and going closer to home. That's just the introvert that I am, I think. But, you know, he really pushed me to go visit the different places that I was accepted and it was narrowed down between Penn State and USC. And as soon as I walked on the USC campus, I'm like, I know, I know this is where I'm supposed to be and when. I told him that he's like, yeah, I told you so. So he's always been one that I've gone back to for advice and we still keep in touch when I'm at home.

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
We try and meet up once in a while. I worked for his wife and I was in college in the chemistry department. So it was really a family atmosphere and I enjoyed that. And then I think, you know, as someone in industry, my supervisor at Grizzles, Christina Cruz, she worked as a CFO before she gave me advice on on what to do. She took the time to really teach me about the essays we were running and why they're important and what the data would be used for. And, you know, she was just very interested not only in what I could do at work, but what my family life was like. And, you know, when I told her that I was pregnant with my daughter, she was so excited for me. So it's someone that really, I think, coaches you not only in your career, but also, you know, taking an interest in what you do outside of work and asking you about that, pushing you to to go for the stars if you want to. Those are the mentors that I think about when when people ask me,

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
That's super cool. I love that story. And I love the connection that you're keeping with your professor from, you know, some 15 years ago or whatever, whatever that was. And because that that means a lot to me as well and know occasionally have folks that used to work for me in previous jobs or things, calling me up, asking for career advice. And it feels good because that is certainly, you know, one of the things I want to do is to kind of leave that impact. And I'm thinking, you know, as you're talking, I was thinking, wow, I bet I bet Jen has a bunch of young analysts in her group that are like would answer the question, said, boy, Jen Zemo would be my mentor. And, you know, and she's done so much for me. And I think that's something really that you should be really proud of, because I know, like I said, you're

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
So for sure.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Yeah. You're a go to within within the company. And I think I know a lot of people look up to you, whether they're in the executive team or in the sales team or in your own team for what a great job you do. So. So also another thing, we're going to be able to travel again here this year sometime, I think. So what's on your travel bucket list and why?

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
Oh, I want to go to Italy. I've wanted to go for years. I want to see the culture, the food, obviously, but so much history there. And my husband was a history major. He's really interested in that kind of stuff. And I don't know, it's just it's something that you look back on and say this. This was here hundreds, hundreds of years ago. So, yeah, I would like to go to Italy just to have wine with every meal. Yeah, yeah. Pasta, all that kind of stuff.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
I'm with you on that. In fact, we've been talking about a trip to Italy for a while. So there's that's one that's definitely on my bucket list as well. One more for you. What motivates you to work so hard every day? Because I know that you do.

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
I think, number one, because I enjoy what I do. I think if I didn't enjoy it so much, I wouldn't work so hard. But secondly, I'm the breadwinner in my family, so my husband's a stay at home dad. He takes care of the kids and their remote learning and so I can focus on my career and and doing my job. So I think it's a combination of of those two things.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Oh, that's awesome. Jen, thank you so much for being on the podcast. Loved hearing about your commitment to training, mentoring, leadership, customer service, all these great things, the fantastic science you're doing. It's cool to see how much the science is still exciting you and carrying on that legacy. This is exactly the kind of conversations we love to have on molecular moments. Just want to ask if you would want to throw out there, you know, or say hi to mom or dad or anything while you're on the podcast. Here's your here's your moment.

Dr. Jennifer Zemo:
Thanks. I think my mom is one of the biggest fans on Facebook of biogenetic, so.

Dr. Chad Briscoe:
Hi, Mom. Awesome. So thanks again, Jen, for being on the podcast. That is all for this episode of Molecular Moments. If you enjoyed today's episode, be sure to subscribe an Apple podcast, Spotify or your favorite podcast app. So you never miss a conversation. If you'd like to hang out with us outside of the podcast, we have many webinars and other presentations available for your enjoyment and education. Enjoy them, as Jen X'mas mom does by visiting biogenetics dot com to see what's coming up and how you can stay in touch. And don't forget to keep an eye out for more episodes coming soon. We're looking forward to some great guests. We have world renowned experts talking about rare diseases, diversity in the pharmaceutical industry, new and exciting technologies in a conversation with a patient who's benefited from the recent tremendous developments in our industry. Molecular moments would not be possible without the support of our sponsor, Biogenetics Labs Biogenetics is a global contract research organization specializing in large molecule bio analysis based in Durham, North Carolina, with labs in Hamburg, Germany, and Boston, Massachusetts. Biogenetics provides high quality bio analytical services to leading pharma and biotech companies around the world. They offer assay development, validation and sample analysis under Nanji LP, JLP and GCP, as well as GMP Quality Control Testing. If you are looking to work with a team of highly experienced scientific and kuai professionals through all phases of clinical development, look no further than biogenetics. For more information or to speak with their scientists today, visit their website at Biogenetics Dotcom.

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