Podcasts

[EPISODE 19] Tricia Sterling Talks Rare Diseases, Trust, and Advocacy

In this episode of Molecular Moments, Dr. Jim McNally chats with Tricia Sterling, Vice President of Patient Affairs at Aeglea. Tricia shares some of her experiences working with patients in the biotech industry for over a decade.

Jim and Tricia’s discussion focuses on the patient side of pharmaceutical research, particularly in relation to rare diseases, as they affect 1 out of 15 people worldwide. They discuss the patient journey, creating better clinical trial experiences, and the importance of giving families hope. Tricia shares how patient advocacy starts with transparency and trust between patients, caregivers, and pharmaceutical companies.

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Tricia Sterling Talks Rare Diseases, Trust, and Advocacy: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

Tricia Sterling Talks Rare Diseases, Trust, and Advocacy: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Intro:
Welcome to the Molecular Moments podcast.

Jim:
In today's episode of Molecular Moments podcast, we sat down with our guest, Tricia Sterling, who's the vice president of patient affairs at Anglia Biotherapeutics. Tricia, welcome to the podcast. Delighted to have you join us today. How about starting with a brief overview of your career and current role at Anglia?

Tricia:
Sure. Thanks, Jim, for having me. I began in the pharmaceutical biotechnology space a little over ten, 15 years ago, working primarily with patients and caregivers with rare diseases. I span the gamut of sales to patient services, to patient advocacy. And today I head up the Patient Affairs Department at Anglia, where I do a combination of both the patient affairs and the patient advocacy.

Jim:
That's great. And typically we bring on scientists and a deep scientific discussion. Today's really an interesting thing about understanding how the work that we do as scientists relates to the patient advocacy groups, the patient affairs groups. It's one of the reasons why I wanted to have you as a guest. We met previously at Rare Disease Week last year in DC. It's a fascinating aspect of the biotech and pharma industry that I think a lot of scientists are probably unaware of, which is one of the things that we wanted to discuss today. So you've been involved in rare diseases. I think first things first, it would be really helpful to help frame the rare disease face for our audience their small number of patients per disease indication, but not always a small field. There are a lot of rare diseases out there and a lot of patients that are affected by this. So maybe just some background on the rare disease space since you've been dealing with it for so long.

Tricia:
Sure. I think by definition, we define rare disease as any type of disease that affects less than 200,000 Americans at any given time. But when you look at that, there's over 7000 of these diseases. And what that really equates to is 25 to 30 million people. So although it's called rare, that's one in ten of us. They talk about if you're in an elevator, one person probably has a rare disease. It's it's crazy because these diseases also affect so many children, which is why it's so sad, because these diseases, a lot of them, I think it's almost 80% of them are genetic based. And when they affect these kids, a lot of these kids don't even make it to their fifth birthday. So although we call it rare, there are so many people that are affected by it. And really there's only a couple hundred of these diseases that have some type of treatment that's effective.

Jim:
It's fascinating to think about those cumulative numbers because in a lot of cases, in the rare disease space and biotech and pharma, you're trying to solve one problem, one disease, one area where perhaps there's a genetic issue, something that you're trying to solve for to help out that patient population. But from the larger picture of rare diseases, one in ten is just an amazing number. It's really kind of hard to wrap your head around it to think that fully 10% of our population has some rare disease. So from your perspective of having worked in this space, what are the things that sort of broadly over all rare diseases that are common problems? Forget the science, the specific gene, but what are the common challenges in the rare disease space that you've seen?

Tricia:
Sure. I think a lot of the common challenges are the fact that these patients and caregivers feel alone. They feel hopeless. They feel like there's nobody that's really working on some treatment for them. Because if you're you know, if you're talking about a disease where maybe there's a couple hundred or 1000 people in the United States who's going to spend the time to want to research and try to figure out something for you. So I think that's very common. I think it's also very common with a lot of these rare diseases. It takes people so long to be diagnosed with what they have. They go through tons and tons of tests and misdiagnosis. And it's just really it's really difficult on the families. These families feel isolated often. They lose a lot of friends. People don't want to keep hearing their sad story over and over again. And I think that is what really is the most heartbreaking, because you see all these people out there when you see them collectively together and they're just alone, they're alone. And a lot of times not very hopeful. These patients and these families have had to go through so much on their own and they know that it's expensive and they know that a lot of times when you're working in industry, things have to make dollars and cents and they wonder is what they have or what their child has going to be. The disease that some companies decides, is in their opinion, worthwhile to spend the money and spend the resources on.

Jim:
I've shared with you previously when we met a bit of my own story. My son suffers from Crohn's disease. It's not a rare disease in any case. We're very lucky that he's in great shape and treated. But we went through about a six month period where we were trying to figure out and get him diagnosed and understand exactly what was happening. And that is a rough period for us as a family. Put a fair amount of stress. I've seen it for other patients. I've spent part of my biotech career working in companies focused on rare disease and totally understand that. So I think people would also be interested to know that, yes, biotech and pharma companies are filled with people that are trying to generate science and work on different diseases and create different drugs and biotherapeutics. But they're deeply engaged with these patient populations. It's one of the reasons why you're in the role that you're in. I think people forget that biotech and pharma, yes, they're there to make a profit. There is an investor that needs to see a return on investment to put that into the next disease that they're going to work on. But patient affairs and patient advocacy is a bedrock part of most biotech and pharma companies, right?

Tricia:
It is. I think it's people don't realize often how closely biotech works with patients and patient groups unless you are one of these patients. But really, that is why I would say I have the best job that anybody could have because I work with these these families and I can engage with them early on and I can learn from them and they can provide tremendous insights on what their needs are. Pharma companies, we work with the larger patient organizations, the the overarching, the nord's that every lives the global genes. But then we also work with disease specific organizations. And it's interesting because we gain so many different insights. I mean, we gain insights on overall rare disease, but then we also gain insight when we go into the specific diseases of the patient populations that we're trying to serve. You know, like what are their unique needs? Because, you know, there's a lot of things that are similar, but there are also lots of things that are unique to that specific population. And it's it's interesting to me because I don't think people often realize how important it is to engage with these actual patient groups. Early on, if we can talk to them in the beginning, we can see what's important to them and we can use this to help with the science part.

Tricia:
Like you guys are typically dealing with the science part. We can see what type of things are meaningful for them, what type of meaningful improvements. You know, I know that your company does a lot of stuff that's different assays. And with the assays you're measuring different markers and endpoints and all that kind of science stuff that I'll leave to your other molecular moments. But, you know, just common day to day stuff when you talk to these patients, you know, you may be trying to lower some enzyme, but to this patient, just the mere fact that they can get up and walk unassisted or that they can dress themselves or that they can have some type of a normal life is really meaningful. And you don't really learn these things if you are only in the clinic. And so that's why I think more and more companies and organizations are hiring people in my role and other roles like me to really engage with these patients and see what their needs are, you know, along the way.

Jim:
It's a really interesting feedback loop, I think, to have the patients and oftentimes the parents of the patients sort of chiming in into this. We design assays, as you said, kind of create these clinical trial protocols, sampling procedures, things that in a sort of sterile environment seem like they make sense. But in the practicality of you're going to ask a patient to come back every day, every two weeks, every month for testing, sampling, collection, dosing, all these things that can be challenges for these families and getting that level of information back from them of how we can help them better, how we can design these things better is, I think, a key part of what you and others like you do. I go back to that rare disease week discussion and just seeing the other people that are in your field providing all this information of what the patient journey is like and how we can better impact that benefits all of us. And it's it's a fascinating window into the practical use of what we are doing, I think.

Tricia:
Yeah, I think it's it's really interesting. As you noted, you know, you talk about the different things that you do in the clinical studies and the trials. And, you know, I always try to stress to the organizations that I work for that we have these patients and their families because it becomes all of them involved when there's a clinical trial because of all the time and. And these people. Are taking time to participate in an investigational drug study for us. And with that, we have to look how it impacts them. And some things are as simple as, you know, we forget that clinical trials often become their vacations because they don't have time to go somewhere else, because they're spending the parents are spending their vacation days going back and forth. Or the mere fact that when they're doing these clinical trials or studies to help us see if a product is is viable, they have made comments. One family made comments to me about how difficult it was. I was having to eat fast food because that's all that there was around where they were at. And it's just things that you don't think about. We think about them often in the room, drawing their blood during the measurements. But what about the hours that surrounding that? You know, especially when sometimes they have to be in a clinic setting for a couple of days and the other family members that are also impacted by this.

Jim:
Yeah, I mean, the just the families alone, the moms, the dads, the caregivers that have to take time away from their job, take time away from their work. There are other children that may not be affected, you know, but they've got to tend to the one that's the current need. It's just a level of awareness. I think that's good for all of us on my side of the fence to have for sure when we try to design these things and make them more practical again benefits us all in the long run. To better understand how can we get a good compliant patient as part of the clinical trial space? I know that one of the things you're definitely an advocate for is early engagement with the patients. Even in the earliest sort of discovery stage from the biotech and pharma side, it's never too early to start thinking about these things, right?

Tricia:
Yeah, I don't think you can start too early. I think, you know, there's a role that they can play. As we talked about, you know, in the in the preclinical and the study design. But I also think there's a role that they can play in overall disease education, because what happens is you get these parents and, you know, their children. If the child has the disease, they have so much knowledge about this that instead of an organization just assuming what you need for disease, education or having some marketing department, just put together a nice little sales slick if you can actually get these people's input, their insights when they read this, what does it mean when they explain their disease or their child's disease to a friend, to a family member? How do they describe it? You know, using the appropriate terminology. I mean, we say so many things that are clinical, but that's not often how a normal person would speak back and forth when they're trying to explain it to someone else. I mean, don't get me wrong, patients and caregivers are some of the most educated on their disease, but they still have to explain it to somebody else. So it's important, I think, to get them involved early and often in the development of the type of education and pieces. But it also is interesting, Jim, because we've done this where I've done this at multiple companies where you'll bring patients in or you'll bring caregivers in and we'll have patient caregiver advisory boards along the way. And whether it's talking about clinical trial endpoints or whether it's talking about how you explain your disease or whether it's talking about what type of patient support program you want, they'll come and they'll give you all these ideas and then they may be disappointed when they don't get it exactly as they asked you.

Tricia:
So it's really important to educate them along the way and let them know we want to incorporate as much as we can. But we also are in a regulated industry and there's some things you simply can't do. And I think over the years the worst thing to do is not to let the people, patients, caregivers know this ahead of time, because then they feel like you haven't taken their input. Because oftentimes I think companies in our industry don't want to have those conversations. But I think when you have those conversations, you're really doing what is important to me and developing that trust and that relationship for the long run. And they understand and they appreciate that. And I think it helps when they see why things happen. I mean, a lot of them will say, you know, very common, the ten minute walk test or whatever minute walk test that you're going to do. And and patients just don't understand. Why does that have to be in there? Because I don't care how fast my child can walk, you know, up and down the hallway in the hospital. And but once they understand that you have to have certain parameters and certain things to measure to ultimately get a drug able to be approved to help the greater good, then it helps them a little bit more, you know. So I think those kind of things are important and that only happens when you engage these patients early.

Jim:
Yeah, I think that level of trust and transparency most people can sort of deal with, I can't get everything. I want, but they want to understand why they can't get it and understand why. Maybe there's a different or better choice or a better way of doing something. And certainly these patients and parents and caregivers know the ins and outs of what works for them. How is it possible to get them through what can be very lengthy trials and monitoring procedures and so on? Do you feel that we're better at this than we used to be? It feels like it's different to some extent that there's more engagement here than there was before.

Tricia:
I do. I think we're I think we're a lot better at it. I think we're a lot better because of the overarching organizations that are creating awareness to patients and to the rare disease population and industry, recognizing that the patients are important. I think it goes a lot about how you engage patients relates to the behavior within your organization, your company. I think when you have this within your company and you incorporate patients and caregivers early on, it really shows the people, whether it is the CEO or the person down in accounting, that they all have a role in helping these patients. But I also think to what you talk about getting better, I think for a long time everybody talked about being patient centric because that was the buzzword. And I think we're getting to a spot now where people are pushing back. And I know I push back and say, let's not just say we're patient centric, but let's actually show that we are. Because it's easy to say, I mean, no one's going to say we're not patient centric. I mean, it's just you know, everybody says they're patient centric, but, you know, what does it mean? And I think about, you know, when I have a lot of times these individual patient groups have meetings and typically they're meetings for their groups to bring other patients and families together will happen on weekends. And I can't tell you how many times over my course of ten, 15 years doing this, other people within the organization may say, Oh, you got to work on another weekend. And it's like, that doesn't even resonate in my head because I think they don't get to choose to just have this disease Monday through Friday. So it's like we have to accommodate these people and we have to do what's right for them. And we can't just say we're patient centric, but when we make those decisions, when nobody's looking, we have to really do what's right for them.

Jim:
I think it cuts both ways to from us of thinking about it on the science side of things, of making sure that we recognize that we're in this for those patients, we're trying to better their life. It is 24 seven 365. They live this. They get up every day thinking about their child or the disease that they have. It isn't just contained within a nine hour workday, Monday through Friday, for sure. And the other part of it, too, is a little bit of remembering that they're our customers. They're looking for us to deliver something. We have to be customer centric, if not patient centric. It's the same thing that ultimately they're the ones that have to live with whatever we provide them with, and it's on us to get it right for them for both the higher purpose and also the purpose of being able to work on the next disease based on this one. So I know that patient advocates sort of sit on both sides of this. So you're you know, you've been in the space where you're doing this for biotech and pharma companies before you have parallel folks, complementary that are on the other side, that are part of the patient advocacy groups themselves. A lot of common cause there. I imagine I've seen all of you kind of band together, sort of share some war stories that are similar there. Just a little bit about maybe the difference from your perspective of being embedded in the company versus embedded in the patient population itself, or maybe you don't see a difference.

Tricia:
Yeah, no, I think they're I think we have the same alignment. I think we all have the same mission that we want to try to help patients in whatever way possible. I think where it varies is the different type of resources you have, whether you're in the nonprofit, you know, versus working for a pharmaceutical industry. And I think it also goes back to your company's philosophy. For me, I have always enjoyed most being very hands on, being very patient focused, but also knowing because I've typically, you know, not typically but often worked with companies that are not going to just write the check. They just don't have the deep pockets to do that. So I am very careful at trying to align, you know, companies strategic imperatives with what matches up with the patient's needs. And you can do lots of things that support and benefit the patients that don't cost tons of money. I mean, what I like to do is I mean, I have always enjoyed over, you know, multiple companies that I've worked at helping patients learn how to tell their story and by helping them learn. How to tell their story, bringing them into an office. So, you know, it works on both sides. It helps the people within our organization see the patient, hear the story. It puts a face and name someone to it, but it also helps the patient be able to advocate for themselves. And perhaps they need to tell that story at another point to somebody else.

Tricia:
Perhaps they're telling it to the FDA, perhaps they're telling it to a state legislator. One difference, though, I think, is we also have to be careful of as the perception of working with industry, because depending upon how sophisticated the patient group is, and I don't mean sophisticated as knowledgeable or not knowledgeable, but more how long they have worked with industry. And a lot of times they don't get to work with industry because there isn't something in the near future for their disease. So they just don't have the liberty to having that interaction. And so I think if you don't have as much experience or if you've had a bad experience, sometimes people can be skeptical of their perception. And so I'm always careful to take that into consideration. And I think this really was a light bulb. It was, I don't know, years ago when a lady from a newly formed patient group and I were introduced and she was her first exposure to working with industry. And she, you know, looked at me flatly and said, we didn't have a product at the time. It was still in development. And she said to me, I don't get it. What's in it for you? Why are you why are you doing this? And I think she was surprised with my answer because I think maybe she would have thought, oh, I'm just doing it because I want to do it. I'm just doing it out of the good of my heart. I'm just doing it because I like you, which all those things are true, you know, on a personal level.

Tricia:
But I had to explain to her that, you know, we're a company and what we're trying to do is come up with a product that can help your child, as well as other people that suffer from the rare disease that you have. And really why we do it is multiple reasons. But the one that I think would make the most sense for you is what we're hopeful for is when there is a product available, we're hopeful that you will share the information with your patient community, with the health care providers, so the patients and the doctors can decide if this therapy is right for them. And I think it's important to share that because you don't want people to think that we're not trying to sell a product, because ultimately, as you said before, we need to continue to come up with science to create new products that get approved to help people so we can develop more and more products. But I do think it's important for them from a trust standpoint to let them know that it's okay if we come up with a product and it's not right for you or your doctor doesn't think it's right for you. All that we can really hope for, in my opinion, is that there is an awareness that there is an option out there for those patients who they and their health care provider think it's appropriate.

Jim:
Yeah. I mean, in the rare disease space, yes. Small patient populations challenging from a development standpoint. But there are circumstances where they have options, they have different potential medications they can choose from, different drugs to choose from. And sharing their stories is an important part of it, to let people know what works for them, what didn't work. I think educating that population, also the feedback to us so that the second and third and fourth generation of these things, we can improve upon them to broaden their use. One of the interesting aspects of patient advocacy, and I think one of the things that I know that you've worked on before is these patients are oftentimes overwhelmed with information. You know, as scientists, we can be very jargony. You know, we put together things that maybe could be more clearly or better explained. And it's not because of a lack of education or lack of anything more than they're just some very complex biotherapeutics and advanced drug modalities out there that people have to learn about because they're putting their family to some extent in our hands and trusting us to treat them safely and treat them well. What is it that we could do as scientists to improve some of these things and better educate them so that they understand what they're getting themselves into?

Tricia:
That is an excellent question because that is what comes up so often. And, you know, when people don't know what they're getting themselves into or are unclear of it, I think is when you worry that there could be some distrust in what you're trying, you know, what we're trying to achieve and that, you know, we're in it for ourselves and not necessarily for them. So I think any type of transparency in sharing why you do things, any type of information related to we do a lot about giving information about clinical trials and what clinical trials mean and what the process is and kind of walking people through. What everything is. One thing that is means a lot to patients and caregivers and I don't think industry often realizes as how much it does mean to them is when they have the opportunity to come and sit and talk to top level people at the companies CEO, CFO, CEO and chief medical officer, people like yourself. Jim and just ask questions where no question is dumb, where they can just ask a question in how they are interpreting something and that they get straight answers back. Maybe not the answer that they think they're going to hear, but I think it's really the transparency that is appreciated by them as well as much access as possible to those within the pharmaceutical industry or organization.

Tricia:
I took a group of patients a couple of years ago through our lab. We were developing a product for them and was able to take them in the lab, some patients from a patient group and to see the excitement first on their faces, to see this is where it's starting. But then it was even more heartwarming for me when I saw our scientists and they're thrilled to death that what was going on in the mice or in the monkeys at this point, these are the kids that one day they'd hopefully be helping. So any type of exposure that they can have, any direct channels of communication, you know, I think oftentimes I've seen this where people from organizations at different positions in the company are somewhat nervous to speak to these patients. It's like there's nothing to be nervous about. You can't say anything to them that they wouldn't value you saying. Just like patients will say to me when we talk about them learning how to tell their story, they'll be so nervous before they do it for the first time. And I remind them, this is your story. There's nothing right. There's nothing wrong. This is your life living with a child each and every day. So those are just a couple of thoughts.

Jim:
Yeah. You know, I've been on the other side of those before and it's amazing where just having patients come in and talk to us. So motivating, you know, you can get to a point where your blinders are on. You're kind of working on your experiments, trying to do the things you do. Having that connection, I think, is incredibly motivating for the scientific community. So many people have their own personal stories and connections to these things that they can relate, but they lose sight of it. Maybe forget after a while. And I think that refresher helps. And I love the fact that learning from the patient's experience can really help us do what we do better and sort of think through how we handle these things. But we have a lot of common things here. I think a lot of the scientific community to in our particular business, we generate a lot of data to support clinical trials and things. And we have scientists ask, well, whatever happened to this program? Where did our data go? What did what became of it? How did this impact anyone? Closing that loop, I think, is a big thing for our teams, too, and that's why we always love getting a chance to speak with patients. So they're always welcome in our shop, that's for sure. To speak with.

Tricia:
Us. I'm going to remember that everybody heard that. Jim said they're always welcome.

Jim:
Once you say it on the Internet, it's out there forever. Absolutely. We're getting towards the tail end of our time. I've got a couple of questions left that I want to make sure that we touch on. First of all, just thinking a little bit about when you're interacting with patients. I know they have a lot of concerns, but what are their top concerns? What are the the things that we can help with to to make a better experience for them?

Tricia:
So I think in interacting with patients, you're right, there's tons of concerns, but the main one is always the unknown. They don't know what's going to happen next to them or their child or their family member. Whoever has the rare disease, they worry that there won't be a treatment in time. So between that and worrying, if there won't be a treatment in time, then there comes in. The tricky part that is becoming more and more pronounced is if there is a treatment, will they be able to get it? Will they be able to afford it? Will their insurance cover it? And who's going to help them? It kind of goes back to your point before when you were talking about all the things people have to deal with on a daily basis. And that's probably the biggest thing that resonates amongst all of these patients, in particular in the rare disease space, is they have so much stuff going on managing their condition, whether it's medical, financial, but they're other family members. And this really weighs on them. It weighs on them because they want a therapy. It's so bad, but then they get concerned that they're not going to be able to get it. And you hear all this stuff in the news. I mean, it's always in the news. It doesn't matter which party is representing what.

Tricia:
There's always things in the news about the cost of drugs, the access to drugs, who's going to research drugs? Is the FDA going to approve a drug? If they don't approve the drug, you know what will happen. And that's tough for these people because oftentimes, you know, they they live and die on what's getting said about their disease state and who's working on it. I mean, I remember there was a drug a couple of years ago. I won't mention what the drug was, but it was a drug that didn't get approval when they thought it was going to get approval. And I was working in an organization that with an organization who was doing something with that disease state. And I remember everybody was disappointed, you know, from a commercial standpoint that this drug didn't get approved. And then there was a lady who worked with the case managers that I worked with, and she said, But what about all the moms? You know, you guys might be sad, but what about all these moms that were waiting for their child to get on something and now they've got to wait for the next something? So I guess I would say that's that's really the biggest concern is what's going to happen next and will there be a treatment in time?

Jim:
Yeah. It's I've heard stories similar to that. It's heartbreaking to think about that that even a drug failing. Yes, you may hit the bottom line of a company, but there's also a patient population that's sitting out there that was waiting for this. And it's something that's no longer a possibility for them. And it's heartbreaking because they've they've invested their time and hope into it and they're hurt along the way by and also it's just a shame. So one last thing and then we'll close out here. The field field's definitely headed in a direction, I think, especially for rare disease because of the genetic elements of these that the advanced drug modalities like cell and gene therapy are becoming much, much larger players in this space. I imagine that they're because it's so new that patients and caregivers really are looking for companies to educate them on. Your intending to modify my genes, how they want to know and understand the consequences of this? Is that something that's that's really risen to the surface here as these programs have increased?

Tricia:
Yeah, it's starting to rise a lot more to the surface and wanting to understand because, you know, you're a scientist, so you understand this. But patients don't. I mean, I don't even understand all the details, all the different ways the gene therapy and things work. And I think it's going to be very important for industry to help educate patients and patient groups on what this means. What are you actually doing to the patient? Because as we all know, the FDA is looking to patients and caregivers for feedback, for feedback in the whole drug development and drug approval process. And with these innovative technologies, they're going to go to these patients to see what their thoughts are. Now, they're not going to determine if something gets approved or not, but they're going to play a critical role. So I think as much information as you can give these patients and families to understand the better, again, like we said early on, they are the ones in this case, you know, an investigational treatment, I guess it is, as opposed to therapy when you're talking or maybe I don't know exactly the technical term when you what you call gene therapy for them, but it's still they're going to be doing something that hasn't been done on that many other people before. And any time somebody, in my opinion, is willing to take that risk to help the greater group of patients with the rare population and other diseases in the future, they owe industry to explain as much as they can and to be transparent and to help them feel comfortable. What we're asking them to partake in and knowing, like I said, knowing that it's only going to benefit everybody in the end because they are going to get asked and they're not just getting asked by their friends, but they are going to be asked from regulatory agencies their thoughts on all this.

Jim:
Yeah, I couldn't agree more. We owe it to them. They're putting their lives, their children's lives, their families lives in our hands. There's really probably nothing that's beyond the pale that we should be expected to deliver back to them when they put that level of trust in us. Well, Tricia, thanks so much. Really enjoyed the discussion. It was good to connect with you again and have this chance to talk about something that I know you're very passionate about. Any final words from you before we wrap up?

Tricia:
Thank you so much for letting me share this today. I just think it's it's so important that, you know, I so appreciate you taking the time to let us talk about the patients in the midst of science. I think you're right. There's so many things that go hand in hand. Science doesn't happen overnight. Just like developing these relationships with these patients doesn't happen overnight. But when you build a solid foundation on both, you know, it's endless. You know, the places that we can go together. And I'm just thrilled to have the opportunity to work in this industry.

Jim:
Great. Thanks so much. The Molecular Moments podcast sponsored by Bayer Genetics, is an ongoing conversation about the various nuances of drug development and bio analysis. In each episode, we sit down with a different industry leader to explore their area of expertise, the industry as a whole, and the mentors who help them become the scientists they are today. It's a podcast for scientists by scientists. Listen and subscribe to molecular moments today on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you like to listen.

Tricia:
Thanks for listening to the Molecular Moments podcast.

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Analytical Assays Determine Biosimilar Product Quality

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Pharmacokinetics & Pharmacodynamics​

See how our PK expertise complements our immunogenicity services by evaluating absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion characteristics of a product.
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